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the house speaker john boehner, the president, you can see him sitting there. let's listen to the president. thank them for their time and i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. we have to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle class families and that our economy remains strong and creating jobs and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country share. our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises and build some consensus to do the people's business and what folks are looking for and i think all of us agree on this is they want to see that we are focused on them and not focused on our politics. my hope is this is a fruitful process where we will come to agreement that will reduce our deficit in a balanced way. i want to thank the leadership for coming and with that wool get to work. thank you very much, everybody. wait, wait, excuse me, there is actually one other point that i wanted to make. that is that my understanding
budget. the congress has a copy of it. i do think it would be helpful if speaker boehner would spell out his approach to revenue. he has said some positive things, but we have not seen any substance to his proposals and his remarks. so i think that would be helpful to get that out in the public as we move forward. >> what about the fact that people like jeff sessions who is a ranking member on the budget committee is asking that efforts be made to have these negotiations open to the american public so they can see what's going on? >> as i said, i think the ideas that are all exchanged as part of this process should be open to the public and the president was very clear as to what his revenue proposal is. it's on the super net. you can actually go see it. speaker boehner has said he's open to raising revenue. he has not told us or the american public exactly how he would do it. so i do think it would be useful if he would spell it out, then we would have two clear proposals on the table to compare. >> well, it's going to be a long negotiation, it seems, tough negotiation to work things th
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
standing next to john boehner? >> and mitch mcconnell -- >> and mitch mcconnell by the way. right. >> the president is in a different position now. re-elected by a pretty impressive margin than he was the last time he tried to forge a deal that collapsed. >> right. that was the debt ceiling. he had a real problem with that with the grand bargain. he also had after the 2010 midterms when he had a lame duck session of congress and he had to give on keeping the tax cuts for the wealthy. this is a president right now who believes he's got some leverage. he got re-elected. and these are republicans who are trying to figure out just who they are andy ds sun the president's press conference earlier this week, he's somebody who studied the flaws of a e d i make some progress without overreaching. it's very clear they're worried at the white house about doing some overreach here. if he can get a fiscal deal done, that will be very, very important for his legacy in the long-term. and he knows it. >> are the republicans operating from the same game plan? >> no. i think they're not. i mean,
as the middle class does not get hurt. house speaker john boehner seems optimistic about these negotiations. >> we can all imagine a scenario where we go off the fiscal cliff. if, if despite the election, if despite the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff and what that means for our economy that there's too much stubbornness in congress that we can't even agree on giving middle class family as tax cut, then, middle class families will all end up having a big tax hike. >> there are no barriers here to sitting down and beginning to work through this process. i don't think anyone on either side of the aisle underestimates the difficulty that faces us. but i do think that the spirit of cooperation that you have seen over the last week from myself and my team, from democrats across the aisle, from the president, have created an atmosphere where i think that, i'm, remain optimistic. i was born with a glass half-full. if i hadn't been i sure wouldn't be here. jon: so let's get to it. how close are we to the edge of that fiscal cliff? marjorie clifton, a former consultant to the obama campaign a
and overspending problem and not an under taxing problem. we heard from speaker john boehner. he said that revenue is on the table. the issue here is that president obama has said he wants to increase tax rates on wealthy americans. the speaker and house republicans are still not on board with increasing tax rates, although perhaps closing some loopholes to raise some revenue, and even though there's a lot of kind of kumbaya going on here, suzanne, there's still a lot of tough work that needs to be done. they're still maybe punting on some of the important issues like tax reform and entitlement reform, but they'll be dealing with the fiscal cliff here in the near term. >> it's probably difficult to tell, but we see these pictures, and it's very common, right? you get about 30 seconds to see them all in a room together. they're patting each other on the back, smiling, and shaking hands, that kind of thick. do we have any sense of whether or not there were any different kind of tone or language when they were meeting behind closed doors that gives us a sense that maybe this is real? >> you know, i t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)